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says it implicates hezbollah. >> a french hostage released by the taliban tells the bbc he believes the deal was done to secure his freedom. and canada welcomes william and kate on their first official trip abroad. it's 2:00 a.m. here in london. >> it is 9:00 a.m. here in singapore. broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america and around the world. this is newsday. >> the chinese communist party is celebrating its 90th anniversary. the world's largest political party with a membership of more than 18 million. and it's managed to stay in power elsewhere have been pushed aside. our correspondent, michael bristow, traveled to the city of yen-on in northern china. the communist base during the civil war more than 60 years ago and considered by many as a birthplace of china's communist revolution. >> the communists like to celebrate their victory. they do it twice a day. there's courage in sacrifice but most of it on one side. they see a partial version of history with a clear message. mao tse-tung's party saved the country. this propaganda is fed to the young, they love the party even befo
hezbollah members charged with killing of the former prime minister are really -- hariri. the government's efforts one now be made to arrest the four men. has blocked repeatedly denounced the tribunal and vowed to retaliate -- hezbollah has repeatedly denounced the tribunal. do we have any idea where the men are? >> people say they don't know where they are and they don't expect the lebanese government to actually make the arrest. this is going through the motions. basically hezbollah is a dominant force in the government and to use their phrase, they will cut the hand of anyone who tries to arrest any of their members. no one is really expecting it to happen but authorities need to make it look like they tried, so when the legal processes go on after the 30-day period, that they won't be criticized by the tribunal and get into various tangles for not having tried. >> we are watching pictures that remind us of the assassination six years ago. it is incredibly inflammatory it -- an inflammatory, is an? the you expect political instability over the next few weeks as this plays out -- do yo
was hit by a car bomb in beirut. members of hezbollah are expected in involvement of the assassination. >> it has been more than six years since hariri 's assassination. now the u.n. tribunal has turned over indictments to lebanese authorities which include a west warrants for four people suspected in the car bombing. -- include our arrest warrants for four people suspected in the car bombing. lebanon is request, the tribunal set up by u.n. security council resolution four years later. this is the firirst wld court with jurisdiction over the crime of terrorism. this presents a test for the newly formed government in lebanon. the prime minister avoided spelling out how he would handle the issue or whether arrests would follow. >> we will deal responsibly and realistically with the indictments. these are accusations, not a verdict, and they require irrefutable evidence. >> the indictments are thought to include people included with the shte muslim hezbollah group. hezbollah has not had -- has denied any role in hariri's assassination. >>>> two french journalists who were held hostage in
not been named, but officials say several of them are members of the shia organization hezbollah, including a senior command the -- commander. >> investigators are working behind these walls and believed they knew it -- they know who killed rafik hariri. the tribunal handed over four names to the lebanese authorities. the names are secret, but the process is not. lebanon is now meant to arrest and detain the suspects. the new lebanese prime minister has said he will deal with the trend -- tribunal accusations in a responsible way. >> today, we are confronting a new reality. i call upon all of us to consciously unite for the greater good of the nation, our safety, national unity, and determination to deal with the situation realistically and responsibly, keeping in mind that indictments are not conclusive and any accusations need solid evidence. every individual accused is innocent until proven guilty. >> the prime minister faces conflicting pressures. the big western powers want him to respect the tribunal. hezbollah is a powerful force within his government. it believes its members now fac
, hezbollah, shia, sunni, it's the end states is a world governed by shari'a. that's their own statements which i outline in the book. the endgame is a world governed by shari'a. they would like to establish what they call a caliphate. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: that is basically an islamic super state all of the world's muslim's nations gathered in one united bloc to take on the west to take on all infidels and subvert them to the law of shari'a. that's the endgame. it doesn't matter if it's the brotherhood, al-qaeda, that is the shared endgame. they may have different tactics but the endgame is the same. >> host: so let's talk about the means to that end because if the muslim brotherhood is kind of the overarching holding company, if you will, of the strict shari'a ideology, would it be fair to say that some of their tactical units would be organizations like the council on american islamic relations or the muslim student association or the north american islamic trust? you know he's, obviously, because they're part of the holy land foundation trial proceeding but how much or how little
that hezbollah the proxy army of iran is arming and training mexico's violent drug cartels. trace gallagher is live in our west coast newsroom. what do we know, trace? >> reporter: we've been following the story for months, this is the first time that a police department from a city along the border has really sounded the alarm. this is an internal memo from the tucson police department that was leaked by the group, a siper hacking group that hacked into the arizona department of public safety maneuvers. it warns of a growing partnership between hezbollah and the cartels and that hezbollah is establishing large stockpiles of sophisticated weapons in mexico. the memo points to evidence such as the arrest of a hezbollah militant in tijuana last year trying to set up a base of operations there. the arrest of another militant in new york, which exposed a huge cashe of weapons stored in mexico, and the fact that cartels are changing tactics, using more car bombs and improvised explosive devices versus guns and knives which has always been their trait. here is a former drug enforcement agent talk
the tea party and hezbollah. we have thomas friedman's shameless comments ahead. plus a 2012 round-up, and why michele bachmann is hoping rick perry doesn't throw his hat in the ring. and this, julia roberts banned in the uk. we'll they you why. those stories and much more. "the five" starts right now. we're waiting on the host to hold a final vote on the boehner plan. quickly the highlights of the plan. the plan will cut and cap discretionary spend buying $917 over the next ten years, and louvre the debt ceiling to rise by $900 billion immediately. but this one, very importantly, no new revenue, no tax increase. after the bill passes, which i think it probably will, the democrats have three options. they have cut, cap and balance already passed. they have the boehner compromise passed. oh, this one, they have more obama economics, bob, which has failed. >> before we get started -- >> oh, no! >> -- i have in honor of my friend, greg, i've gotten you all this t-shirt i have, which says i love the debt debate. here you go, greg. debt ceiling debate. whatever. >> bob, i will wear this
for this book, among the people you interviewed was mohammad, often described as the spiritual head of hezbollah. and so you traveled pashtun you just weren't -- this is not armchair literature. you traveled in lebanon and those with an enough example you into a very well-known known palestinian refugee camp about an hour or so south of beirut. >> i went there, both scary places. you can't imagine conditions under which these palestinians live in lebanon are not allowed to vote, not allowed to hold jobs in most areas of work or profession. that in itself is remarkable for lala was when the spiritual heads was really an incredibly interesting man. i felt initiative speak to those folks on the sort of advanced line. i see the government was arranging for me because we discussed the scum he was on the staff, the terrorist list of the state department. but nontheless, conversations with hamas with hezbollah, and others was very useful to try to create a rounded picture of what would be an incredibly complex situation if you're hunting for a bomb. >> and i'm wondering if any of the interviews you did
of munitions, hezbollah have missiles that keep ships at bay and that's why secretary gates was questioning whether the forced entry mission has a future. how do you operate in an environment where bad guys will have night vision equipment and greater intercon activity and how do you come up with that? >> we don't want to do the assault in that environment. in other words being able to do the assault someplace else. that's maneuver warfare by definition. so we want to go where the enemy is not. not always the situation. so we want to bring all of the elements of our national power to bear. and that sounds like a platity todd but there is a lot of capabilities, the air force and the army and navy bringing to bear here, help our agency partners shape the battlefield. and it may not be that you see the marines come in on d-minus whatever like we saw in the pacific, maybe a little bit later on after we've had the opportunity to shape the battlefield. so i'm not fearful that we will not be able to come in. we will be able to come in. we will be able to prevail because not only just the weapons,
of the former lebanese president back into the five. the members of the shiite military movement hezbollah, which has consistently denied involvement in the killings, but has yet to react to the tribunal's announcement. the whereabouts of the suspects remain unknown. >>> the legendary german soccer star is the new head coach of team usa. he won a world cup as a player into the six and that the german national team to a third-place finish. -- in 2006 and helped guide the german national team to a third- place finish. >> germany celebrated their third-place finish on home soil. in his two years as germany's coach, he introduced and refined a dynamic style of soccer that proved effective on the pitch, while exciting the fans. his unconventional training methods drew duration initially. they have since become standard practice. into the senate, he took the head of munich, the winning side in the bundesliga -- in 2006, he took the head of munich, the winning side and the bundesliga, but he cannot see how identify with the management. ahe was sacked with five games left in the season. he is now
to liberals as hezbollah, terrorist organizations, suicide bombers and cult -- >> not your style. >> sean: forget about not my style. >> if you don't like it why would you do it. i don't like it either. >> sean: all right. you don't like it either. if the left keeps doing it. the left keeps attacking viciously, sarah palin, michelle bachmann. here's the problem, you say it, a couple other democrats say it. it goes in passing. it didn't get noticed and keeps happening. if the a conservative says it they get fired their advertisers get targeted. liberals can say anything. but free speech doesn't exist for conservatives in the media any more that's the problem. >> david brooks said it, he didn't get fired. he's a rhino now. >> sean: david brooks has never been a conservative. >> i'm going to say what i really feel about this mate. i think republicans are being irresponsible now. i think using analogys like hezbollah or terrorists or suicide -- suicide bombers or hitler or anything like that, that doesn't do anybody any good. >> sean: you know what is irresponsible? bankrupting the country. y
figures -- the lebanese shiites e-mailing. hezbollah were pretty popular figures among ordinary arabs. just to ask you a question, your contrasting the activism of khamenei in the iranian revolution with the normal mainstream shi'ism of others that you describe him as being a steady rebuke to the iranian establishment at one point. but surely the rise of solder in lebanon, the rise of the lebanese shia that predated hezbollah and iranian influence, the rise of shaikh mohammed who led a strong shia movement that had roots among shia across the arab world, would argue a little bit against that. there's often ideal -- a view that the ayatollah is not just led by -- and that there's a lot of dynamism. looking to as we intended to do some younger people. how would you react to that? >> guest: i think that's correct in terms of shia rise. the shia certainly downgraded, downtrodden, dismissed within the muslim world, for generations and generations. to the point it is going back centuries and centuries. and that rise was detectable fairly early on. and certainly before the iranian revolution
, you have israeli complication, you have questions about iran and hezbollah. over the last couple of months the administration has ratcheted it up saying that assad has lost his legitimacy. secretary clinton seemed to take it a bit further. >> if anyone, including president assad, thinks that the united states is secretly hoping the se sheem will remerge from this turmoil to continue its brutality and repression, they are wrong. president assad is not indispensable. and we have absolutely nothing invested in him remaining in power. >> is absolutely nothing invested in him, is that taking it to a new level? and if so, what next? >> i think it is, john. i think it's the strongest statement that i've heard from the obama administration. it's the correct path to take. i think we may be an important moment in this crisis. the syrian government has run that country with an iron fist, the assad family for 40 years. they're losing control. they don't control the major cities. they don't have enough military personnel to contain these peaceful demonstrations. and it may be at the momentum
.o.p. did not stand up to this hezbollah faction in their midst it would basically be a suicide mission and nic kristof called them domestic terrorists. i thought after gab guy gabby give. the president called for it and he admonished people. i thought we were down this new path of getting along. i want to start with you before we get to the tea party perspective. are we going a little overboard here in the country is still standing the last time i checked. >> yeah, a little overboard. but, i mean, this is an emotional time and some of the people in the republican party are acting like children and it sounds like. >> laura: the democrats never do that but go ahead. >> i'm thinking that the parents are saying you are acting like children, it's time to calm down and stop saying no, no, no, no. you have to work and learn to be civilized adult and that's the problem. the parents are reprimanding the children and sometimes it comes off. >> laura: i think the parents sound a little silly themselves because the tea party is actually the group that got everybody to the table to actually have th
where hezbollah dwells in and around lebanon from direct confrontations with members of hezbollah to being in the middle of 2006 war against that group. this is a thrill ride of a book and i can put it down. he is done impeccable work and he is a brave, brave on the ground journalist. another book i've been dying to get to for a while now, large book that will take up a lot of my beach time, the legacy of the islamic anti-semitism via friend of mine, dr. andrew boston a preeminent expert on islam and lastly i would love to dig into power of faith and fantasy by israel's ambassador to the u.s..
would think you were very well connected. >> you also interviewed for this book mohammed of hezbollah so you were not just -- this wasn't just armchair literature, the trouble in lebanon and elsewhere and for the civil you went to a very well-known palestinian refugee about an hour or so south of beirut. >> and both scary places. you can't imagine conditions under which the palestinians live in lebanon in most areas of the professions but was one of the spiritual head of the shia world which was an incredibly interesting man and i felt it necessary to speak to those folks in the sort of advanced mind. obviously the government wasn't arranging it for me because i discuss he was on the terrorist list in the state department. but nonetheless, conversations with hamas to try to create a pitcher the be incredibly complex situation hunting for a bomb in the middle east to read >> i'm wondering if any of the interviews you did with people who most americans they may not even know the names, but certainly are aware of the dangers and all these places, did any of these interviews change your pers
in lebanon with hezbollah. our greatest ally in the arab world was mubarak in egypt. president obama sat on his hands when our ally needed american people -- needed american help. barack obama chose not to help him. what has happened since? now we see iran coming in to be egypt's best friend. for 30 years egypt did not have diplomatic relations with iran. they had open relations with israel, more so than any other arab nation. now we are seeing the door slam on israel's face. the doors opening on iran's face. we are seeing the rise of the muslim brotherhood in egypt. this is not a good thing. now libya. this is worst than what we had seen before. secretary of defense gates said of libya that gadhafi had not attacked the united states nor posed a threat to the united states. he also said there is no vital national u.s. interest in libya. he said he didn't know what the united states military gel or objective would be. worse, we don't know who the opposition forces are in libya. what does that mean? the only evidence we've seen is that al-qaeda of north africa may have a presence as well a
propaganda photos like these of islamic militants from hamas and hezbollah. albador says he downloaded them for research. >> they frisked me. they put me in handz cuffs. >> reporter: he was jailed and interrogated -- they put me in handcuffs. >> reporter: he was jailed and interrogated and. >> they asked me if i had ever been to a mosque, what religion and nationality my parents were. >> reporter: amador was released but the government kept his computer for 11 days. he was one of nearly 12,000 travelers who have had their electronic devices searched at the border during the past three years. abador and the aclu are suing the department of homeland security to stop those searches unless there is a reasonable suspicion that someone broke the law but d.h.s. argues electronic devices are no different than luggage and if the search has affected less than 1% of the 36 million travelers subjected to border security screening. d.h.s. would not agree to an on-camera interview but a spokesman told us searches of laptops and other electronic media are a targeted tool to ensure that dangerous people an
in the creation of what was a completely new found organization hezbollah. >> it is in the book. [laughter] he did nothing. he did worse than nothing and pulled those marines were in lebanon at the time in to waiting ships offshore then off they went nobody said a word about a because fortunately for president reagan, there was another war. a tiny one in a successful one. grenada that took place at exactly the same time but here is the essence of the republican tough guy who reacted to vietnam in a fashion that could have done any liberal democrat proud. >> when i approach the research on that chapter and was thinking about reagan come i approach it with memories never again that i carry with me even at the time i was covering them which is hollywood, an actor, there is no great depth but i have to tell you that reading his diary and the letter that he wrote, the thousands of letters over a lifetime of politics if you have any fairness within new you have to judge this man in a totally different way. that is one of the things that i learned by the way of researching the reagan chapter. i had a dif
correspondent and michael takes new-line a wild firsthand tour of the neighborhoods where hezbollah dwells in and around lebanon from direct confrontation to being in the middle of the 2006 war against a group of this is a thrill ride i cannot put it down based on a taxable work and he is a brave on the ground journalist. another book i have been dying to get to, a large book to take up my the time is the book of islamic anti-semitism from a preeminent expert on islam and leslie i love to dig into power faith in fantasy by israel's ambassador to the u.s. writing it before he was ambassador but a history of american involvement in the middle east and is a very timely to say the least the. >> i am thrilled to be here if they do to the farm policy association what has played such an important role in my bankroll of what i do in what to think the colonel and all cadets who are here from west point. was point* is one of the most inspiring places i have had privileged to go to. every time i go there i am in off of the career these young women and men have chosen i can not start without saying th
al qaeda of course and its affiliates. to two other groups such as hezbollah. so i think again, i have to say that i am not in a position at nctc now so i approach these types of questions with some humility and some deference to the professionals who are looking at these questions on a daily basis. >> one last question if i might. earlier this year undersecretary colin from the treasury department told the finance committee on which i serve that kuwait has become one of the most challenging countries to deal with when it comes to counterterrorism and in addition bad as other gulf states have improved their cooperation with u.s. terrorist activities in the gulf, we are seeing in effect kuwait become more permissive, significantly more permissive. do you have an opinion on this yet? >> my answer senator if i may is somewhat general. i would say our relationships with countries such as kuwait and other gulf states and certainly countries like pakistan are complex and have multiple dimensions. i do think that the counterterrorism effort is a central goal or a central feature of those
tour of the neighborhoods where the terror group hezbollah's dwells in and around lebanon from direct confrontation with members of hezbollah to being in the middle of israel 2006 war against a group of this is a thrill ride of the book. i can't put it down. he is the impeccable work and his -- he is a brave, brave journalist to another book, will take up a lot of my beach time, the legacy of islamist anti-semitism. and lastly i would love to dig into power, faith and fantasy. it is the history of american involved in the middle east. very timely to say the least. >> visit booktv.org to see this and other summer reading lists. >> robert rosen spoke with booktv in our recent trip to charleston, south carolina, about his book. >> i wrote this book because when i wrote the book about charles i was surprised that the jewish community was so -- usually don't associate the jews with confederacy. but, in fact, i think the truth is hundreds of thousands of jews, not hundreds of thousands, but 150,000 jews came to america in 1840s. and they were german. they spoke driven. they're mostly immigr
intercepted last year, we had the entire ordinance of hezbollah for the second lebanon. one ship . so we are concerned with ships coming in not because they bring in love boats and cruise liners and tourist. we don't care about that. but they bring in weapons . so we have a naval blockade against that. you can bring in anything to gaza except weapons and that's what we are trying to enforce. >> mike: i am pretty sure if a boat made its way in new york harbor filled with weapons, i ceened of have a feeling that u.s. and mayor bloomburg would react the same way. i don't think you could import a glock much less a ship full of heavy arm in our own ports and so certainly stand to reason you have difficulty with that? >> i suspect if thousands of rockets had been fired from a neighboring country, a neighboring territory to the united states, and more was en route by boat, you would stop this. you actually did this with a cuban blockade. president kennedy put out a blockade because of aimed at the united states. we haven't taken out the missiles from gaza. but we don't want more missile to come
. clearly they have not. they're in color of iran and hezbollah and hamas and the wahhabis are still out there. what we're seeing for the first time is the rise of this other story. and it's going to give people a clear choice. >> bruce feiler, good to have you. >> thank you, fareed, always good to see you. >> and we will be right back. any questions? no. you know... ♪ we're not magicians ♪ we can't read your mind ♪ ♪ read your mind ♪ we need your questions ♪ each and every kind ♪ every kind ♪ will this react with my other medicine? ♪ ♪ hey, what are all these tests even for? ♪ ♪ questions are the answer ♪ yeah ♪ oh >>> this is, of course, independence day weekend in the united states. and that brings to us our "gps" question of the week. might seem like an easy one but watch out. the question is what happened on july 4th, 1776? was it "a," congress voted for independence, "b," the revolutionary war started, "c," the declaration of independence was approved or "d," the declaration of independence was signed? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. ma
of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet unknown. reservoirs of black gold. the u.s. geological survey estimated that this part of the eastern mediterranean could hold nearly 2 billion barrels of recoverable oil and huge reserves of gas. in these watt ears behind me lies what may be the savior for lebanon's ailing economy and fields of gas and oil, a discovery that may draw a new era for a country historically struck by political and economic problems. he is excited by the prospects. >> the prospects that we have are spread all over the exclusive economic zone where we have a high potential of gas and oil fields. >> but in this region. potential comes with problems because lebanon and israel can't agree on the invisible line in the sea that would mark their maritime border. >> reporter: it's significantly further south than the line israel is further proposing. it also confl
for free lebanon and free democratic progressive lebanon. five years later, hezbollah, that hope was bashed . you know, the question is where do the arab countries and iran go to . it started in tehran when the ayatollah regime stole the election and millions of those . millions walked in the streets and were butchered and silenced. there is a yearning in arab world and slam sham world and middle east for a new beginning. i think most people left to their own devices, they would opt for a democracy. but they are not left to their own democracy. people wit the guns and superior organizations, they deprive them of their freedoms as they did in lebanon and as they did in iran. we would like, we all would like to see a triumph of democracy. if democracy triumphs, we'll have peace. because in a genuine democracy, the public will. most people don't want sons and daughters to go to battlefields to die. they don't want war and don't typically initiate war. if we have peace and genuine democracy. we'll have genuine peace. but the jury is out on where it is going. let's hope it goes the right directi
they have gone away, clearly they have not. they are in control of hezbollah and hamas and still out there exporting. what we are seeing for the first time is the rise of this other story. it's going to give people a clear choice. >> bruce, pleasure to have you. >> thank you fareed. always great to see you. >> we'll be right back. >> so, ah, your seat good? got the mirrors all adjusted? you can see everything ok? just stay off the freeways, all right? i don't want you going out on those yet. and leave your phone in your purse, i don't want you texting. >> daddy... ok! ok, here you go. be careful. >> thanks dad. >> and call me--but not while you're driving. we knew this day was coming. that's why we bought a subaru. >>> this is, of course, independence day weekend in the united states and that brings us to our gps question of the week. it might seem like an easy one but watch out. the question is, what happened on july 4th, 1776. was it a, congress voted for independence, b, the revolutionary war started, c, the declaration of independence was approved or d., the declaration of indepe
, the rise of the lebanese shia that predated hezbollah and the irony in influence, the rise of sheik mohammed, who led a strong movement that had their roots among shia across the arab world would argue a little against that. there is a lot of dynamism not necessarily i iranian but looking as we tended to do how would you react to that? >> guest: i think that is correct in terms of the shia rye is. certainly they downgraded the downtrodden dismiss within of the muslim world for generations going back centuries and centuries come and that rye is was sensible early on time and even before the iranian revolution. but what has happened was the parallel with the nationalists it goes on. >> host: these movements that should be one of three for more progress get taken over by radicals in the case of the shia rise by a revolutionary iran that is the revolutionary in the sense of against international order so that by taking over we get the iranian republic of today which has set itself against the international status in order. do you think that a post revolutionary iran it's hard to define
apparent in recent years was that some iranian figures -- the lebanese shiites emulating them hezbollah were pretty popular figures among ordinary arabs. just to ask you a question, you're contrasting the activism of the khomeini and iranian revolution to normal mainstream shiaism. you describe him as a city rebuke to the iranian establishment at one point. but surely the rise the rise of sadr and the shia that predated iranian influence, the rise of sheik mohammed who led a strong shia movement that had roots amongst shia across the arab world would argue a little bit against that, among shia i talked to there's often a view the ayatollah of naja are pretty sleepy old fellows but there's dynamism in the world and looking to sistani, and some younger people is wise. how would you react to that? >> i think that that's correct in terms of shia rise. the shia certainly downgraded the downtrodden, dismissed within the muslim world for generations and generations. i point to it going back centuries and centuries. and that rise was detectable fairly early on and certainly before the iranian r
that predated hezbollah and iranian influence, the rise of mahamed who led a strong shia movement with roots among shias across the arab world would argue a little bit against that. there's often the view that the itolas led with sleepy old fellows, and there's a lot of dinism, not necessarily iranian, but in the shiite world looking as we tended to do some younger people, how would you react to that? >> guest: i think that that's correct in terms of shia rise. the shia certainly downgraded, downtrodden the myths within the muslim world for generations and generations. i point to it going back centuries and centuries, and that rise was that the it was early on before the iranian revolution. what has happened here that as in across the parallel with the nationalists, it goes long. these movements that should be one of reform or perhaps progress get taken over by radicals in the case of the shias, taken over by a revolutionary iran, that it's a revolutionary in the sense of a revolution that is against international order so that by taking over the state of iran, we get the iranian republic of
progressive lebanon. five years later, hezbollah, iran's proxy and iran control lebanon. so that hope was dashed and the question, where does the rest of the arab country go to. where does iran go to, a non-arab country and started in tunisia, the ayatollah's regime stole the election, and millions walked into the streets and they were butchered quickly and silenced. there is a palpable yearning in the arab world and in the islamic world, in the middle east for this new beginning. i think most people, left to their own devices, you know, they'd opt for a genuine democracy, but they're not left to their own devices, the people with the guns and the people with the superior organization, they deprive them of their freedoms as they did in lebanon, as they did in iran. you know, we'd like to, i think we all would like to see a democracy. if democracy triumphs, we'll have peace because in a genuine democracy there's a public will. most people don't want their sons and daughters to go to battlefields, to die from bombardments, they don't want war, don't typically initiate wars, democracies.
, there are reports syria has shipped missiles and weaponry to hezbollah and lebanon. >>> venezuelan president hugo chavez is headed to cuba for cancer treatment. after a heated debate, the lawmakers approved his request to undergo chemotherapy in havana. chavez shouldn't be in charge while he's in cuba say opponents. he's delegated some of the duties to the vice president and finance minister but is not fully relinquishing power. >>> in india, a boy's recovering after being rescued from raging flood waters. the four-year-old was bathing in a river when he got stranded on a rock. when onlookers extended a wooden stick his way he fell into the water and swept away. several people jumped into action and pulled him to safety. he survived and was eventually treated at a hospital. >>> under the d.c. teachers -- hundreds of d.c. teachers out of work. we're going one-on-one with the teacher's union about the firings. >>> and millions of harry potter fans say goodbye to a fantasy favorite. what the cast of the movie is saying about the end of an era. ouewti >>
and turn the region into a powder keg and invite hezbollah and hamas to take advantage. i urge my colleagues to support the resolution and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlelady from florida reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. berman: i'm pleased to yield 1 1/2 minutes to member of the committee, the ranking member of the oversight committee, the gentleman from missouri mr. carnahan 1 1/2 minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carnahan: i call upon my colleagues to support this resolution strongly. the commitment toll israel in a negotiated settlement by and between the israelis and palestinians. the future of israel is linked to that of its neighbors in the middle east and north africa. with gas prices rising, conflicts in that region have a direct impact on americans here at home. i have long supported a two-state solution to the conflict with israel as the recognized home of the jewish people and a strong palestinian state to promote the well-being of the palestinians as well.
politicians savaged by the main stream media as hostage takers, members of hezbollah, and deranged cult leaders for doing no more than keeping a campaign pledge. wasn't keeping ones word to voters seen as a positive political characteristic instead of a personal moral deficiency. keeping promises is a virtue. republicans who vote to raise income taxes in 2011 can be expected to sent home in 2012, period, end of political career. that's the big question. how can john boehner, whether the republicans move off the pledge they made now. they've dug in so deeply. >> some members, i signed this tax pledge. i would be able to go back to the voters and say, we're going to close some tax loopholes here. i want ge to pay more than zero dollars. i want general electric, the largest corporation in the world to pay more in taxes than you and your family. that work down -- that work down at the diaper. i want to make sure that warren buffet pays a higher tax rate than you. >> by the way, he agrees. >> that drives the truck. and warren buffet agrees. you can make that argument if you want to. >> peopl
. >>> >>> an international plot to buy military-grade weapons to help arm hezbollah. >>> and thick black smoke as firefighters try to tame a fire at a plastics manufacturing plant near san francisco. now back to "hardball." >>> i will not vote to increase the debt ceiling. it goes completely contrary to common sense, and how i grew up in iowa. we have to deal with the economic reality. and i have the will and i have the courage to see this through. i'm michele bachmann, and i approve this message. >> i love this, the zeile phone tink on the background. welcome back to "hardball." when it comes to the debt crisis we know where the tea parties stand. michele bachmann, leader of 9 the tea party of the house. you saw in her campaign ad. what about other republicans running in 2012? why haven't we heard from them? a great question. michael shear writes for the famous "time" magazine and ap definite article, i had to say the "time" magazine. look at romney. his tweet. he's been criticized by some for not saying much about how he would handled the debt ceiling. today he tweeted. not an appropriate me
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